Guest Post: Almost 70% of People Can NOT Distinguish Gmail’s Real Login Page From A Scam – Can You?

In the last decade, Google Workspace has become one of the most commonly used platforms for email and collaboration with over 1.8 billion users worldwide. Asserting it’s mobile-friendly dominance, 75% of those users access Google’s apps on their phones for the reliability and convenience of staying connected on the go. 

Unfortunately, Google, and many other large companies – including Fedex, Amazon, and Netflix – are often impersonated by bad actors looking to phish users and scam them into sharing personal details and account information with incredibly convincing, but fake, login pages. 

Only 33% Of People Could Distinguish A Real Website From A Fake

Many of us would like to think we recognize Google when we see it on our phones. However, a recent survey conducted by Lookout, the leader in delivering integrated Security, Privacy, and Identity Theft Protection solutions, has discovered phishing pages are so deceiving that only a third (33%) of consumers could reliably distinguish the real Google login website from the fake website, below:

Note, in the image above, “Option A” is FAKE, and “Option B” is REAL

Learn the tips to protect your email and safeguard yourself against ID theft: 

  • Google recommends that customers never enter their password after clicking a link in a message. If you’re signed in to an account, emails from Google won’t ask you to enter the password for that account. If you think an email that looks like it’s from Google might be fake, go directly to myaccount.google.com/notifications. On that page, you can check your Google Account’s recent security activity.
  • Attackers will always try to create high-pressure situations that cause you to not think about what’s happening. If you’re ever contacted in this way and the individual is asking you to download an app or click a link, simply don’t. 
  • Download a mobile security application on your device – like Lookout – that will block connections to phishing sites before they can do harm and alert you immediately if you download a malicious app. 

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