Guest Post: 24% of Americans Share Work Passwords With People Outside The Organization Says Atlas VPN

Data presented by Atlas VPN reveals that 24.39% of Americans share work passwords with people outside of their workplace. 

Many employees in the United States are not cautious about who they disclose their work-related passwords to. This puts enterprises in danger of being hacked if these credentials fall into the hands of someone negligent or with malevolent intent. 

A total of 1,000 full-time workers in the United States took part in the survey carried out by Keeper. The survey was completed in February 2021 and the results were published in May 2021. 

The findings reveal that 7.89% of respondents have shared work-related passwords with their significant other or spouse in the last year. Also, as many as 4.33% of employees provide their work-related credentials to their children. 

On the same note, 5.81% of those polled admitted to sharing work-related passwords with another family member. In short, 18.03% of US workers share passwords with members of their family or significant others.  Yet, this is not the end of the story because 3.78% of employees provide their work passwords to ex-colleagues.  

Similarly, 2.58% of office workers provide work passwords to their friends that they don’t work with. Usually, that friend also has close friends, so it could turn into a long list of people who have sensitive passwords very quickly.  

Sticky note fiasco 

Over half of those polled (57%) admit to jotting down work-related web passwords on sticky notes. This alone poses a significant cybersecurity risk to their businesses. The surprising fact is that two-thirds (67%) admitted to losing those sticky notes.  

To read the full article, head over to:
https://atlasvpn.com/blog/24-of-americans-share-work-passwords-with-people-outside-the-organization

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