Cisco Webex Announces Real-Time Translations

Today Cisco announced the availability (in preview beginning this month) of its real-time translation feature while also dramatically expanding the language library from 10+ to more than 100 languages, ranging from Armenian to Zulu. As part of the all new Webex, organizations can provide employees with inclusive and seamless collaboration experiences, which is essential to supporting the needs of a workforce that is more globally dispersed than ever before.

Users can create their own personalized Webex meeting experience  by quickly and easily self-selecting the language of their choice from the most commonly used languages, such as Arabic, Dutch, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Mandarin, Russian and Spanish, as well as more localized languages such as Danish, Hindi, Malay, Turkish and Vietnamese. The personalized language experience provides a path through one of the major hurdles in global business – the language barrier. Now users can engage more fully in meetings, translating from English to 100+ other languages, enabling teams to communicate more effectively with each other, and opening new opportunities for businesses to build a more inclusive, global workforce.

For businesses, there’s a talent and cost benefit. The feature enables businesses to focus on finding the best talent regardless of wherever they call home or their native language. And a recent report from Metrigy on intelligent virtual assistants found that nearly 24% of participants have meetings that include non-English native speakers and of these, more than half have been using third-party services to translate meetings into other languages (incurring an average cost of $172 per meeting). Integrating intelligent virtual meeting assistants with language translation capabilities significantly reduces or even eliminates this cost entirely.

The expanded Real-Time Translation feature will be available in Webex as a preview starting this month and will be orderable and generally available in May.

One thing that you should note is that not all dialects are included in translation.

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